I Care - Big Black (2) - Big Black & The Blues (Vinyl, LP)

We booked our own tours, paid our own bills, made our own mistakes and never had anybody shield us from either the truth or the consequences. The results of that methodology speak for themselves: Nobody ever told us what to do, and nobody took any of our money. The members of Big Black have often been asked why we chose to break up the end of the band having been announced well in advance just when we were becoming quite popular.

The best answer then and now is: To prevent us from overstaying our welcome. It seems preposterous now, but at the time, people seemed overly concerned about the literal meaning of our lyrics. I know we never discussed it amongst ourselves. Lyrics seemed a necessity, so we had them, but the subject matter was an extension of our interests — not part of a political or aesthetic battle plan. The lyrics were subject to change at whim once the subject had been decided on anyway. Anybody who thinks we overstepped the playground perimeter of lyrical decency or that the public has any right to demand "social responsibility" from a goddamn punk rock band is a pure mental dolt, and should step forward and put his tongue up my ass.

What we sing about is none of your business anyway. Musically, Big Black's insistent drum machine rhythms, abrasive textures, and obsessively repeated riffs provided a major part of the blueprint for so-called industrial rock.

Their bracingly intense music aside, the saving grace of the band's often obnoxious approach was that it was thought-provoking. Big Black set a standard for freedom of expression and forthrightness that has been emulated to varying degrees ever since.

New York : Little, Brown and Company. Retrieved Touch and Go Records. Pigpile CD booklet. Big Black. Chicago : Touch and Go Records. Jive Time Records. Retrieved 20 September New York : Viking Press. Archived from the original on Top Scrap Recordings. Warsaw, Illinois : Contortmedia. The Boston Phoenix. MTV News. A few exceptions exist: Clear vinyl, picture discs and glow-in-the-dark pressings are more susceptible to poor playback.

Very few additives can be mixed into clear vinyl without jeopardizing the opacity, which means there is a potential for worse sound quality, albeit this drop is often imperceptible to the common listener. Picture Discs are a different story. They are typically made of 3 layers. The first layer is a clear record with no music, the second is the picture layer, and the third is a clear plastic sheet that contains the grooves.

This final thin and malleable plastic layer is not as durable as regular records, which can negatively affect both the playback and long-term durability. The process of pressing a multi-colored vinyl adds about a dollar to the production cost, so from a material perspective, yes, colored vinyl records are worth more. The real cost differences come from colored releases often being pressed in limited batches. This drives down supply while increasing demand, leading to higher market costs.

Vinyl records are collectible items, with more colorful pressings often increasing the aesthetic appeal. Clever minds have ingeniously paired colors with the vibe of the record. But this seems to be an exception from the rule. If an album comes out on colored wax you can almost be certain that it will be more sought after in the future.

Any way you cut it, many collectors will seek out the wacky colored variant without exception. And colored vinyl has reached near ubiquitous levels. This would have been unfathomable just twenty years ago.

Nevermind has been repressed on vinyl more than times over the years and among the many pressings there are a smattering of colors, gatefolds, tri-folds, billfolds, and probably skin-folds as enticements to throw down money and hear this album once again on a shiny new piece of wax. The album has been released a number of times after this pressing, and even the later four-disc deluxe set on black wax sells for a third of the blue variant price.

First off, did we need this repress? With original pressings being relatively easy to find and affordable, this release showcases how badly record companies overthink the success of RSD, a common complaint which we recently explored. A fine example of unbridled financial hysteria is in the case of the recent Mondo repress of the soundtrack by Alex North.

Your description of the picture disc process is incorrect. Always a good idea to do proper research before writing anything. Not being an audiophile, I always liked vinyl and specially limited editions. That being said, when I had the choice, I always went for the picture discs and colored vinyls, even knowing them to be not as good. But things have changed for sure, in these last years.

Long live vinyl!! Good thing, though, Kubrick otherwise went with a smart choice of timeless Classical blended-with some Avant-Garde of the era instead for the final product. Nice article. I am happy someone brought this up.

I always wondered…is there really a difference? I mean, come on…who really wants to buy cassettes? I learned as a child at elementary school age how to play vinyl and care for it. However I do still buy vinyl on occasion depending on various factors and have accumulated a nice little collection since the 80s. I have always found it questionable the sound of colored vinyl, with picture discs sounding the worst.

I always opt for black vinyl when I can. Sitting on the orange shag carpet, gazing at the album jacket. No color of any kind can match it. Colored variants to me have always seemed like cheap alternatives issued only as cash-grabs. I manufacture vinyl for a living. The notable exception is glow-in-the-dark plastic, which is dreadful stuff. Where you will naturally find playback issues is on discs pressed with multiple colours, either in segments or as splatters, especially mixtures of opaque and transparent plastic.

It took 5 fives minutes to realise it was looping! My only bugbear is the near transparent vinyl with multiple tracks on either side. Back in the days of DJing it could be a bit of a nightmare trying to quickly cue up the track you wanted because the cue point ie start of the track would show on both sides and mistakes could be made when you thought you had cued it up only to find out it was halfway through the desired track because you were literally looking at the track on the other side of the vinyl.

In a dimly lit room, it made for some funnily frustrating times. I am not an audiophile and never have been in all my 46 years of listening to vinyl except classical music which is better on cd! Side one 1. Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy 2. Tower of Babel 3. Bitter Fingers 4. Tell Me When the Whistle Blows 5. Cartoons art of animator Chuck Jones. The most popular song on the album and possibly by Big Black, "Kerosene", has a shaky guitar line that gives it an odd appeal and a slower rhythm than most Big Black songs.

It discusses being bored and then as a result wanting to be set on fire. Violent lyrics such as these occur throughout Big Black's entire discography. He's A Whore Remastered. Both songs on this release are covers, the first track by Cheap Trick and the second by Kraftwerk.

The cover of the 7" sleeve imitates both of the original singles. Heartbeat Remastered. Headache Remastered. The record generated some controversy due to a cover photograph of a shotgun suicide victim whose head was split in half; it only appeared on a very limited edition of the record and was later replaced with a drawing by Savage Pencil.

The identity of the dead man in the original album cover is still currently unknown. Original pressings bore a sticker reading, "Warning!

Not as good as Atomizer, so don't get your hopes up, cheese! This also came at a time when major labels were first starting to warn parents that albums contained "explicit lyrics", and while all of Big Black's records contained such lyrics, Headache's sticker was an ironic dig at mainstream music.

Special Records. Colored Vinyls. Gold Disc. Picture Disc. Other Special Records. Best magazine. Juke Box magazine. Record Collector Issues. Special Issues. Monthly magazines. Platine magazine. Other Magazines.

CD players. Music Sheets. Concert Tickets. Groovy Objects books, mags, t-shirts Sell Compare. Price : Format : LP. Seller : recordsbymail. Format : 12 inch x 1. Seller : recordsale. Price : 2. Format : CD. Seller : eurecords.

Nov 01,  · Order Black To Blues Volume 2: lirichildbagcalot.smutuatiminincolthuadyrocirrrighces.co Big Legged Woman from Black Stone Cherry's second blues themed EP Black To Blues Volume 2. Black To.

8 Replies to “I Care - Big Black (2) - Big Black & The Blues (Vinyl, LP)”

  1. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of Big Black & The Blues on Discogs. Label: UNI Records - • Format: Vinyl LP, Album • Country: US • Genre: Jazz, Blues •/5(7).
  2. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of Big Black & The Blues on Discogs. Label: UNI Records - UNLS ,MCA Records - MAPS • Format: Vinyl LP • Country: UK • Genre: Blues •.
  3. Discover releases, reviews, credits, songs, and more about Big Black - Big Black & The Blues at Discogs. Complete your Big Black collection/5(8).
  4. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of Blues Are Black on Discogs. Label: Harlem Hitparade - HHP • Format: Vinyl LP, Compilation • Country: US • Genre: Funk / Soul, Blues •4/5(14).
  5. BIG BLACK - & the blues - lirichildbagcalot.smutuatiminincolthuadyrocirrrighces.co Music Skip to main content Amazon Music Unlimited Prime Music CDs & Vinyl Download Store Settings Share. Buy used: $ + $ shipping Comment: VG+, UK, some cover wear; BIG BLACK: & the blues LP, UNI Add to Cart. Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon Image Unavailable. Image not available.
  6. Kind Of Blue (Vinyl) Miles Davis. out of 5 stars 4, # 1 Best Seller in Jazz. Vinyl. $ Bohemian Rhapsody [2 LP] Queen. out of 5 stars 6, Vinyl. $ In stock on September 17, It does not have every single good song he performed. But, you cannot get all the best songs on 2 Vinyl discs, so I think the selection /5().
  7. Percussionist from Savannah Georgia, born in Big Black was William "Fish" Ray's younger brother who was a Vauderville performer. He started playing percussion in Miami in the 50's and performed with various salsa and calypso bands until he moved to New York in the 60's.

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